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SDR Superhero Episode 6: Brandon Hardy @ Snowflake

Meet Brandon Hardy, a sales development representative at Snowflake. We sat down with him to get his top tips for being a successful SDR. 

What’s the craftiest way you’ve gotten a meeting booked?

The best way to get a meeting booked is by texting them. If I call someone on my work phone and they don't answer, I'll call them on my personal phone. And if they don't answer my personal call, I'll send them a text that says:

Hey, my name is Brandon, and I work for Snowflake. Are you interested in meeting with us next week? 

How do you handle rejection in sales?

Sales is like life so you're going to have ups and downs. I've had people hang up on me. I've had people say don't call me again. I have had people say you really don't get it, I don't want to talk to you guys.

I've had a lot of really mean things said to me, but the key is to remember that though it might be difficult in that moment, it's just one person. There are millions of other people to call and prospect. So you have to get that out of your gut as soon as it happens because it's going to happen to all of us.

What’s the best piece of sales advice you’ve ever received?  

My first piece of advice is that sales is a numbers game. So you want to make sure that you're not just hitting your quota, but that you're maximizing it. If your quota is 10 meetings a month, get to 20. 

Secondly, in the SDR role, I tell people all the time that come under me to take care of what you have to take care of. Everything else is going to work itself out. You can't do your manager's job. You can't do your rep’s job. You just need to do your job. You need to set quality meetings for people. 

Number three is to not overcomplicate things. We already have a really hard job. And as an SDR, we have to prospect and set the meetings. We have to make sure that those people who we prospect and set meetings with actually attend the meetings.

So there's a lot going on. A lot of research, a lot of prospecting, a lot of calling, emailing, and LinkedIn requests. So make sure that you're doing your job, and make sure that you don't overcomplicate what you’re doing.